Tinkering School

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All Girls

All Girls Workshop Slam Dunk

All Girls, Physics, Mechanical, Interactive, Fabric, Unusual MaterialsLindsay JonesComment

On Saturday 8 girls came together to figure out how to make a Dunk Tank full of pillows! It was an ambitious project for one day: it had moving parts and would need to be safe enough for humans to be on and inside of it. Could it be done?!

First we practiced using our main tools safely while also getting to know each other and practiced our other main skill: collaboration!

During the Design phase of the project, tinkerers thought through possible mechanism functions and structure design using each others arms and pencils, sketching out shapes and dimensions, and talking through combining ideas up on the drawing board.

Madeleine uses Olivia's hand and arm to show us how a lever could trigger something.

Madeleine uses Olivia's hand and arm to show us how a lever could trigger something.

We decided to kick off building with the things we knew we would definitely need:

A Tank

A Seat

A Target

Jordan clamps a corner together, so she can drill.

Jordan clamps a corner together, so she can drill.

The tank is formed!

The tank is formed!

Maddy cuts foam on the bandsaw so we don't get "butt splinters" as we slide into the tank.

Maddy cuts foam on the bandsaw so we don't get "butt splinters" as we slide into the tank.

Pearl marks where her team needs to drill holes to attach a hinge to the target.

Pearl marks where her team needs to drill holes to attach a hinge to the target.

At mid-day we have almost a whole, stable Tank, a cushy Seat, and a Target lever arm!

We discuss the next steps as a group and figure out what we need to before we start tinkering with connecting the Target to the Seat.

The Seat group decides to take a cue from our folding shop tables to create a support that swings flat.

The Seat group decides to take a cue from our folding shop tables to create a support that swings flat.

Tank team builds a ladder so we can climb up on to the seat! No detail is getting past them!

Tank team builds a ladder so we can climb up on to the seat! No detail is getting past them!

Seat and swinging support beams were attached and the trigger too, so that we would have a beginning point for connecting the Trigger and the Seat.

Madeleine holds the Seat of the way so that Jordan and Maddy can attach the seat!

Madeleine holds the Seat of the way so that Jordan and Maddy can attach the seat!

The first attempt at mounting the Swinging Seat Support revealed that our cross beams needed to be spaced out more and that we had attached the hinges to the support on the wrong side!

The tinkerers quickly got to work making adjustments together!

Meanwhile - the Tank team is preparing the pillows and getting yoga mats for safety!

Jordan gives the pillows a quality control test.

Jordan gives the pillows a quality control test.

Soon, we had a hinged seat resting on a hinged support, which was connected to the trigger's lever arm with paracord all suspended over a pile of pillows and yoga mats! It looked very precarious: the seat was only touching the support on the very tip and those of us that were on the larger side were pretty sure if we sat on that thing it would just snap off. 

And so we entered the all important Safety Testing Phase!

Crash test Stumpy is prepared for its dunking!

Crash test Stumpy is prepared for its dunking!

The tinkerers make a list of dangers we need to observe and secure for it to be safe for humans.

The tinkerers make a list of dangers we need to observe and secure for it to be safe for humans.

Stumpy, didn't break our tank or hit its head on anything, we didn't see or hear any snaps or creaks, so Pearl bravely volunteered to be our first, smallest human test.

Pearl waits in suspense!

Pearl waits in suspense!

It worked! We dunked EVERYONE! It didn't break! IT WORKED!

Today was a particularly special One Day Workshop. We almost never actually finish a project. We are usually tinkering with a project up until we run out of time so it works exactly how we want it too. If we check those first two off it usually breaks while we are playing with it. Wow.

Looking back, I think that this group of tinkerers were especially good at communicating and collaborating with each other, so that everyone knew what jobs needed to get done and so that we could agree on what those jobs were.

With a strong streak of collaboration all of our mistakes that we had to re-do a few times didn't set us back and we all had a really fun day!

For more photos of us tinkering check out the Flickr Album!

All Girls Welding Workshop! 10/23/16

All Girls, Metal, Technical Skills, WeldingLindsay JonesComment

Welding workshops start off with a demo of what welding even is!

Look at these pieces of metal melted together!

Look at these pieces of metal melted together!

Ready?! Set. WELD!!

We discuss what safety measures we all need to take and why.

One of the most important rules is to assume that all metal is hot. Why? Because at some point today it was 3,800 degrees!

Everyone feels the heat radiating from the freshly welded metal.

Everyone feels the heat radiating from the freshly welded metal.

Once everyone is suited up it's time to weld!!! Everyone gets a few practice passes to figure out how to control the welder's motions. 

We decided this weld was too fast because they weren't one continuous caterpillar, and the circles were too skinny.

We decided this weld was too fast because they weren't one continuous caterpillar, and the circles were too skinny.

We all become welding detectives and check the welds to figure out if we need to go slower, make bigger circles, get the tip closer, or lots of other tricky adjustments!

Then we weld more!

Then it's time to dig into our brains and the metal tubs and figure out what to create!

Are you going to plan something? Or just starting welding things together?

Some kids were practicing welding super tiny pieces together. Some difficulties reported were: keeping the pieces in place before welding, not being able to see where you want to weld, and melting your tiny piece of metal.

Over at the Experimentation Station, kids were making mistakes and getting really excited about it!

Lucy accidentally melted through her super thin book end and loved it so much she decided to make the whole thing look like "crusty swiss cheese".

The discovery of hole melting was explored by some other kids with thicker metal and they ended up with molten bubbles that looked like volcanos!

As always, we got creative with clamping and connecting our projects into the welding circuit.

Aaaaaaaaaand as always we spent some time figuring out why the welder stopped working. Sometimes they just need some love and a new welding tip. Sometimes we get to open them up and untangle their insides!

Check out all the mistakes we learned from and the sculptures, gifts and furniture we made today!

                      Click here to see more epic welding photos from the workshop!   

                      Click here to see more epic welding photos from the workshop!

 

Random Critter Creator - All Girls Workshop

All Girls, Open Ended Design, Unusual MaterialsLindsay JonesComment
IS EVERYBODY READY?!

IS EVERYBODY READY?!

Today we learned.....

How to keep ourselves and our friends safe

How to keep ourselves and our friends safe

That if the wood isn't moving, then you clamped it correctly

That if the wood isn't moving, then you clamped it correctly

That two screws at a joint keeps the wood locked in place.

That two screws at a joint keeps the wood locked in place.

To find out what we would be building today everyone had to roll a die first and write down the number, then pick a body part.

Our Random Critter Creator told us to make a critter with:

Whoa!

Whoa!

Everyone sketched up what they thought the critter should look like. Some were cute, some were round, some were angley. Then we had to figure out how to make it out of wood!

We learned that to figure out how long something is you can use :

a measuring tape!

a measuring tape!

or your Friend!

or your Friend!

We learned that sometimes a partner makes things a little easier and a little more fun.

We learned that sometimes if you want it just like that, it might take a lot of steps and focus.

We learned that to get the adults to work in your assembly line, you have to put a drill in their hand.

We learned why there are different sizes of screws.

And we learned how to work together to make these: 

into a really huge Critter like this:

The 6 fingered, 6 toed, 3 tongued, 2 headed, 5 nosed Critter (6 tummies not pictured)

The 6 fingered, 6 toed, 3 tongued, 2 headed, 5 nosed Critter (6 tummies not pictured)

For more photos from this workshop visit the Flickr page!

Who Run Da World!? Girls!!

All Girls, Interactive, Narrative, Open Ended Design, Super SillyLindsay JonesComment

We were ever so lucky to end our 2015/2016 workshop season with a packed All- Girls Workshop.

We had an great opening circle where we got to know each other by asking "What's the heaviest or most awkward thing you've picked up?" A lot of us have tried to pick up our parents.  Once everyone is feeling a little more comfortable in the space and with their new friends it's time to meet the tools!

Chopsaw!

Chopsaw!

Clamps!

Clamps!

Drills!

Drills!

Then it's time to talk about the project!

As we were settling in to announce the project and start designing I over heard one girl sharing with another "We ran a 5k!" I was pretty impressed, wrote it down and asked everyone what else they do. We quickly had a really great list of things that girls do:

And it was pretty obvious to all of us that girls, if you take all of the ones that exist in the world, do everything.  Which is exactly what our project was going to be: a Beyoncé inspired "Who Run da World? Girls!!"  For that we needed a World and something to make it Run.

These tinkerers are brain storming how to make a globe.

These tinkerers are brain storming how to make a globe.

Another team made a list of things that spin to get some inspiration from.

Another team made a list of things that spin to get some inspiration from.

The kids quickly solved the problem of how to rotate a World - hang from some rope and spin it.  It was so simple, so quick and so easy.  What would we do the rest of the day?! Go watch the Carnival parade!?

Girls are the best.

We decided that we could think of some more complex ideas and try them, just for fun. The hanging rope could be a back up support for testing trickier mechanisms.

By the end of the Design Session we had a World team, a Pyramid stand team, and a Spinning base team.  The best part of the design selection is that we had varying levels of complexity and if they all were completed we could combine them all together!

Time to combine our tool skills and make stuff!

The World decided to make a inner frame and then use wire to create a round outer layer.

The Pyramid team had some complicated angles to figure out and also a stability puzzle to solve!

The Spinning Base group decided we wanted a circle and lots of wheels! Then some handles for all of the girls to spin the World together!

When we had run out of time at the end of the day The World was a really epic frame that looked like a huge jack.

The Pyramid team had finally figured out how to make their angles and supports work, but didn't have enough time to put it together.

The Spinning Base was spinning and had lots of strings for a lot of girls to help rotate it, but we hadn't tested how strong it was and that World looked heavy!

At closing circle everyone shared the challenges that their group faced and how they had collaborated. Today we had a lot of kids floating between projects and helping out each group, which was really cool to see.

We got the World safely clamped to the Spinning Base and as one of the girls pointed out - they walked the world around - so we sent them out into the larger world to run that one.

:)

One Day Welding Workshop - All Girls

All Girls, Metal, Technical Skills, WeldingCaroline ScanlanComment

There were sparks flyin' at Tinkering School today...eight girls walked out of the building this afternoon with new skills under their belts. They're welders, now!

The welding workshops are pretty different than the wood-based One-Day Workshops... because, well, metal is much different than wood. Also! Unlike our more team-built wooden projects, welding is really hard to play as a team sport.

This means a few things:

  1. We have to translate our Tinkering School goals (building something bigger than yourself, learning from failure, collaborating and making friends, and trying harder than usual) into a curriculum where solo technical skills are being practiced. (Today, we admitted that really, welding workshops are all about failing once, failing twice - failing a lot of times - and learning from those mistakes!)
  2. Also, the kids are (usually) making individual projects. (Which makes the failure goal kinda hard. Hey kid, get really attached to this project -- and oh, by the way, you're probably going to fail at making it.)
  3. And! Even though these are solo jams, we gotta share the equipment. We have 3 welders to share. This means a lot of the day's learning is based on watching other people try really, really hard.

By the end of the day, everyone had transformed a pile of steel scraps into a  unique project of their own design. Many of the welders used the drill press to drill holes into their work, and most of them used the grinder to smooth edges, cut off small pieces of steel, and correct mistakes. Oh, and everyone made loads of mistakes! We even had a chance at the end of the afternoon to share our favorite mistakes of the day. This unique opportunity to normalize failure as a crucial part of the learning process is one of the things we value most at Tinkering School. 

Via the collective mistakes of the day, these new welders learned that:

  • Freshly welded metal is hot to touch
  • We should always remember to pull our hoods down before starting to weld and drape the welder over the table when we're done, so as to not accidentally pull the trigger!
  • The drill press speed needs to be adjusted for different drill bits
  • Sometimes you can grind your welding project into two pieces by accident
  • Sometimes you might weld your steel pieces into the wrong place. It's okay to start over.
  • Mistakes are normal and useful and great.
  • They could make cool, functional, and whacky stuff out of steel (!!!)

You can check out even more awesome photos from the day by checking out our Flickr album.

What's An Angler Fish? All Girls Workshop

All Girls, Direct Provocation, Narrative, Super Silly, Aesthetic ChallengeAmanda SimonsComment

I got to spend my Sunday with seven rad girls who were really excited about building some awesome stuff. This is usually the first sentence of any All Girls Workshop blog that I write, and today was, of course, no different! However -- the thing that made today especially unique, was that I didn't really have any idea what the thing we were building actually looked like.

Actually, let me back up. This sounds no different than usual. In these workshops, the Collaborators come up with a rough theme before the kids arrive, and then during the workshop the kids are the visionaries of the project. They tell us what it should look like and how to make it, and we jump in where we can help and also provide technical advice to make the thing safely come to life. 

So, let me clarify. When Lindsay, Caroline, and I sat down and tried to think of the workshop theme, Lindsay and Caroline said "Let's make an angler fish!" And Amanda said, "I don't know what that looks like. How am I going to help lead this?" They both tried to describe what the thing looked like, and after their description, I had a general idea, but still couldn't quite associate a visual with all those words. 

Perfect!

I asked the kids to make an angler fish today so that I could forever associate a visual with the description. 

This is what happened:

We brainstormed and made individual drawings of the fish critter. From there, we figured out what all the illustrations had in common. 

We brainstormed and made individual drawings of the fish critter. From there, we figured out what all the illustrations had in common. 

And then, we picked a place to start. Because the materials we were working with were really good at making cubey things and not real great at making round things, we started with a cube for a fish body. After the cube, we could easily add on. 

And then, we picked a place to start. Because the materials we were working with were really good at making cubey things and not real great at making round things, we started with a cube for a fish body. After the cube, we could easily add on. 

Building the cube meant we had to learn about other tools along the way. Clamp training was done as we went along. We also used some assembly squares to help keep right angles and hold the wood in place. 

Building the cube meant we had to learn about other tools along the way. Clamp training was done as we went along. We also used some assembly squares to help keep right angles and hold the wood in place. 

It's worth noting that a 4 foot by 4 foot by 4 foot cube is actually quite big and awkward to move around. 

It's worth noting that a 4 foot by 4 foot by 4 foot cube is actually quite big and awkward to move around. 

This fish has jaws, and that meant movement. We chose some hinges to help out -- or, rather, to help us make mistakes. The jaw was actually quite tricky to attach, and the jaw-making team had to redo the hinge placement three times before arriving at a functional solution. 

This fish has jaws, and that meant movement. We chose some hinges to help out -- or, rather, to help us make mistakes. The jaw was actually quite tricky to attach, and the jaw-making team had to redo the hinge placement three times before arriving at a functional solution. 

In the end, the Tinkerers decided to get eaten by the fish. 

In the end, the Tinkerers decided to get eaten by the fish. 

And, I present to you... Angler Fish! (Complete with disco light attachment). 

And, I present to you... Angler Fish! (Complete with disco light attachment). 

Thanks, Friends. I am forever going to associate this visual with "angler fish"!

Check out more angles of our awesome Angler Fish by browsing Flickr!

Tie those shoes! - One Day Workshop - All Girls - 4.9.2016

All Girls, Engineering Challenge, Interactive, Open Ended SolutionPiper AlldredgeComment

I think it's important to point out that the brainstorm for this workshop started a bit like this.

Suffice it to say, we LOVE all girls workshops! They're such a great introduction to the space, materials, instructors and pedagogy here at 1960 Bryant St., and today was no exception. 

We decided to go with a challenge for today's workshop: tie a pair of shoes from 10' away. Holy woah. 

The day started like any other: some coffee talk around the nametag table, then we spent some time practicing with the tools we'd be using for the rest of the day.

Lily mindfully practices using the chopsaw.

Lily mindfully practices using the chopsaw.

All of us practicing drillz together.

All of us practicing drillz together.

Then we ate some snacks and talked about tying shoes from far away and then started playing with rope and chopsticks to see if we could tie shoes with less than 5 fingers. It was pretty silly and fun!

Lindsay, Amanda, Olivia and Anna try to tie a length of paracord around a water bottle just using pencils as chopsticks.

Lindsay, Amanda, Olivia and Anna try to tie a length of paracord around a water bottle just using pencils as chopsticks.

At some point we decided we should actually decide what the steps are to tie shoelaces.

At some point we decided we should actually decide what the steps are to tie shoelaces.

We decided that we needed to split into two teams: one to work on making 'hands,' and one to work on making a structure to support the hands and arms. Then we got to work!

Olivia, Beatrice and Sophia figure out what the hands actually need to do: grab, pinch, and stick. 

Olivia, Beatrice and Sophia figure out what the hands actually need to do: grab, pinch, and stick. 

Here's an early design drawing of the structure to hold the 'arms.'

Here's an early design drawing of the structure to hold the 'arms.'

After eating some lunch, we got back to work, and got down to the real down and dirty of tying knots with (basically) long sticks. In the end, what we really needed to do was PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. 

Olivia and Sophia became veritable pros at tying knots using long sticks!

Olivia and Sophia became veritable pros at tying knots using long sticks!

Meanwhile, Anna, Rhea, Lindsay and Lily finished up assembling the 'shoulders.'

Meanwhile, Anna, Rhea, Lindsay and Lily finished up assembling the 'shoulders.'

Lily finishes up adding some supports to the frame of the shoulders.

Lily finishes up adding some supports to the frame of the shoulders.

After working really hard on all of the pieces, we upgraded from short to long chopsticks, and had loads of time to practice trying really hard to tie knots using our long chopsticks.

Sophia, Amanda, Olivia and Beatrice try to pass the loop through to finish up tying my shoes. It was so great how so many girls jumped in to help lift up the weight of the chopsticks to help the lace-tiers out. 

Sophia, Amanda, Olivia and Beatrice try to pass the loop through to finish up tying my shoes. It was so great how so many girls jumped in to help lift up the weight of the chopsticks to help the lace-tiers out. 

You can see SO MANY MORE pictures from the day on our flickr--check it out!

All Girls Welding Workshop!

All Girls, Welding, Super Silly, MetalPiper AlldredgeComment

The first workshop I ever helped at here at the Tinkering School was a welding workshop, so they hold a special place in my heart. Sparks fly, kids are on the edge of their seats, ears perked, super interested in what exactly is happening when that special yellow-green light is glowing. All Girls Welding Workshops are extra special, because I think they get really close to so many of our goals: nix the jargon, learn a technical skill, and practice so many social emotional skills along the way. 

Lulu (and Ava!) with her giraffe and tree sculpture. Lulu is a welding regular; she started this sculpture at her last workshop a few weeks ago, and brought the head back today to finish making the body.

Lulu (and Ava!) with her giraffe and tree sculpture. Lulu is a welding regular; she started this sculpture at her last workshop a few weeks ago, and brought the head back today to finish making the body.

We started the day with a quick safety overview: heat, UV rays, and electricity. Assume all metal you see is hot today! Give it a quick wave with your hand before touching it. Wear your safety glasses all day! Even at lunch, because UV rays are invisible. While there is a whole lot of electricity moving from one end of this circuit to the other, it's actually pretty hard to get yourself into the circuit. Everybody, make sure to stay dry during this welding workshop, and we should be good. Also, ask your kiddo about the amperage:cars, voltage:road talk. It's one of my favorites to give!

Then, we got started with the real meat of the day: trying welding (some for the first time!), designing a project and getting to work!

Abby, Marisol, Audrey and Amanda get ready for their first times welding.

Abby, Marisol, Audrey and Amanda get ready for their first times welding.

Sophie measures some pieces of 1/2" square tube to see if they will work for her table.

Sophie measures some pieces of 1/2" square tube to see if they will work for her table.

Today was so awesome for this reason: everyone got so much welding done! With 3 welding stations, 9 kiddos was a great number. One welding, 2 on deck. While on deck, kiddos needed to figure out how to setup their work in order to be ready go when their turn arrived. We explained at the beginning of the day that about 90% of welding is just getting your work and your body setup and ready to weld. This means using magnets, clamps, other pieces of metal to, whenever possible, weld in the direction of gravity (flat position) and thinking about where you will rest your non-dominant arm to stabilize your had that is holding the welding gun. These kiddos really took this to heart, and thought through their setup instead of grabbing for the trigger. While this takes a bit of time, it meant we could move through turns really efficiently, which meant kids got lots of time on the welder. Yay!

Addy and Evan working on her pencil box.

Addy and Evan working on her pencil box.

Audrey working on her box; it may or may not help her get her room organized.

Audrey working on her box; it may or may not help her get her room organized.

Then, at the end of the day, everyone did an amazing job helping us clean up. A few even helped us grind the tables clean to be ready for our next welding workshop! Today was the best. What can I say, we really really did it today!

Check out more pictures from today on our Flickr!

 

BUILDTIONARY-One Day All-Girls Workshop

All Girls, Open Ended Design, Unusual MaterialsRachel EconomyComment

Today, we built a California Bumblebee Disco Ball with Eyebrows and Spirals.

 

You know, like usual. Just another creative, wacky day at the Tinkering School!

 

In fact, as far as I know, we have never before built a Californian Bumblebee Disco Ball with Eyebrows and Spirals. Perhaps no one has! We could be the first.

 

The way this wild and amazing amalgam came about was as follows: it was a rainy Sunday. We wound up with a very small and very hard-working group for our all-girls workshop. We sat down at a table after tool training, and we filled a hat with slips of paper. On those slips of paper were words- all the words we could think of.

 

Then, throughout the day and starting with our first design session, we pulled words from the hat, adding them to our design prompt and our tinkering.

First, it was a Disco Ball Bumblebee.

 

 

Then, it was a Disco Ball Bumblebee with Spirals and Eyebrows.

 

Teamwork on the bandsaw brake!

Teamwork on the bandsaw brake!

 

And finally, as the day was drawing to a close, the eyebrows were cut carefully on the bandsaw (out of wood- no actual eyebrows were harmed in the process), and the glittering mirrors were affixed to the body of the bee, we found out that the bee was from California.

 

 

This game of pictionary-turned-buildtionary kept every tinkerer and collaborator engaged, thinking on our toes, and having to re-imagine and re-negotiate throughout the day. It also added a delicious mystery, anticipation, and surprise to a grey Sunday. Each tinkerer got to use a large number of tools and materials, and at the end, our parents and families came in to try to guess what it was we had built. 



All Girls Welding Workshop!!

Welding, All Girls, Problem Solving, Open Ended DesignLindsay JonesComment

 

Today was a good day.

One girl even said that we should call this Fashion Workshop instead of Welding Workshop, because of the fabulous gear and grime smudges we were all wearing.

Welding workshops are a little different than our regular workshops, they are ALL about mistakes. That's basically what we do the whole day, is mess up over and over again.

These kids were excited and afraid and went for it! They asked for help when they needed it and worked on their own when they could.

Everybody really focused and got lots of time at the welders. At the end of the day we had some unique picture frames, platforms, shelves, and presents for little brothers!

Woo Welding!



All Girls Welding!

All Girls, Welding, Open Ended DesignLindsay Jones

We recently had a day for young women to come try their hands at welding! Our Intro to Welding class is a great way to get a feel for using a welder and get comfortable making sparks and heating up metal!

We start off talking about what dangers we might encounter while welding and how to counteract them so that everyone stays safe. Then we all don the safety gear and get to it!

But wait! Before we can make sparks fly we have to figure out how to keep our pieces in position, how to hold on to the welding gun with giant gloves on, and where to put ourselves so we can weld as well as possible! Whoa! So much to think about at once!

The girls weld scraps together all morning, checking each bead to see if they need to move slower or change their hand motions. Pretty soon it's time for snacks and design time!

After the plans were laid, all manner of measuring and cutting began. This group all had very unique projects and they had to custom cut almost everything!

These tinkerers showed a lot of perseverance and patience while learning how to use the welders and they all left with impressive creations. It's always exciting to see each Tinkerer bring their designs to life and see in their faces how proud they are of their accomplishments.

All for One and One Couch For All

All Girls, Interactive, Problem SolvingLindsay Jones

For our second All Girl Workshop we decided to make the Biggest Couch in the World! That way we could all relax together after a long day of hardwork!

Team Side-Arm figured out how we were going to get up on the couch and not fall off the ends.

They got really creative and made a climbing wall for one end and a ladder for the other!

Team Seat-Butt cranked out sections to sit on.

Did we say "sectional"? This couch is gonna be "sectionFULL"!!

Once we figured out how to make one section the tinkerers could split into teams and have several sections in progress at once.

After we framed the couch it was time to make seats!

At the end of the day the two teams attached their sections to make The Biggest Couch In The World! It was interesting to see how the two teams working from the same measurements, made different design choices and turned out ever so slightly different sections.

After a safety test everyone climbed up and enjoyed a well deserved lounge on our custom couch!

And They Gnashed Their Terrible Teeth!!

All Girls, Mechanical, InteractiveLindsay Jones

This last weekend was our first All Girl Tinkering School! We wanted to give young women and girls a unique environment in which to develop their tinkering process and tool use skills.  

As always we started with tool training where everyone practiced using the chopsaw and power drills safely and effectively.

After we get comfortable using the main tools it's time to refuel and figure out how we are going to make........Giant Chompers!!

We determined that chompers have two jaws, two lips, and toooooons of teeeeeeeeeeth!!  A tinkerer pointed out that the boxes the jaws would be made of looked like ladders, which helped us quickly count how many ladders per box and how many boxes per jaw.  One team went to the chopsaw room to start cutting our cross pieces.

While the rest of us prepared to receive them by preparing our materials and having a quick clamp tutorial.

Once our supply of pieces arrive Team Assembly gets to work!

We leave Frompie’s jaw fragments to rest while we eat lunch.  All the chomping that we do inspires us to make teeth! These tinkerers made so many different kinds of teeth in so many ways! Some assembled the jaws while others began their foray into dentistry.

As the day draws to an end we assemble the top jaw and install eye-bolts to attach Frompie’s jaw muscles to a pulley in it’s skull. Lips are applied. Frannie and Lorelei worked on making the hinging mechanism where Frompie’s two jaws meet each other. We put the jaws together as parents arrive and Frompie is so snaggle-toothed that they can barely chomp us a greeting!

Chomp Time from Tinkering School on Vimeo.

We loved watching this group of tinkerers naturally form teams to get jobs done. They figured out how to let each person have a meaningful turn using the chopsaw and we even caught them taking turns doing a particularly challenging task that no one really wanted to do!

Together they easily fit tons of building and tons of fun into just a few hours.

More pictures on the Flickr !

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